Monday, June 30, 2008

40th Illinois

On back of monument:
40th Illinois,
Commanded by 1. Col. S. G. Hicks, Wounded.
2. Lieut. Col. J. M. Boothe.
Occupied this, their third position, about 12.00 m., April 6, 1862, and held it until 1.30 p.m., sustaining their heaviest loss. The regiment then fell back to the landing. Its loss in the battle was 1 officer and 46 men killed; 11 officers and 149 men wounded; 9 men missing; total, 216.

6th Iowa

On back of monument:
Iowa 6th Regiment Infantry Volunteers,
Commanded by Capt. J. W. Williams, (Wounded),
Capt. Madison M. Walden.
This regiment held a position near its camp on the Purdy road, the extreme right of the army, until 10 o'clock a.m., April 6, 1862. Then it moved to the left and rear, and was engaged in this vicinity against a strong force of the enemy's infantry and artillery, for four hours; its last position being in Jones field, from which it was ordered to retire about 2.30 p.m. It then fell back to the support of General Webster's Artillery, where it was engaged when the battle closed, at sundown. In detachments, commanded by company officers, the regiment participated in the movements of the army throughout the 7th. Present for duty; officers 27; men 605; total, 632. Its loss was, killed 52; wounded 100; captured 37; total, 189.

Sunday, June 29, 2008

McDowell's Brigade



This brigade, of three regiments , was encamped on the Hamburg and Purdy road, its right on the high ground near Owl Creek, in the following order from left to right: Fortieth Illinois, Forty-sixth Ohio, Sixth Iowa. At the first alarm Sunday morning, April 6, 1862, each regiment formed upon its color line. Two companies of the Sixth Iowa, with one gun of Behr's battery, were on guard at the bridge over Owl Creek. About 8 a.m. the brigade was advanced to the brow of the hill overlooking Shiloh Branch, the Fortieth Illinois joining the right of Buckland's brigade. After a skirmish with Pond's brigade McDowell was ordered at 10 a.m. to retire to the Purdy road and move to the left to connect with Buckland's brigade near the crossroads. In obedience to this order the brigade abandoned its camps without a contest and moved by the left flank past McDowell's headquarters, when it was discovered that the Confederates occupied the road between this bridge and Buckland's. McDowell then moved directly north and put his brigade in line on west side of Crescent field, facing east, where he engaged and drove back the force of the enemy moving into said field. The brigade them moved northeasterly across Crescent Field and into Sowell Field, facing south, its left at Sowell house, where it connected with McClernand at 11:30 a.m., and advanced with him to the center of Marsh's brigade camp. Here Sixth Iowa was transferred from the right to center of brigade, and Thirteenth Missouri placed between the Fortieth Illinois and Sixth Iowa, the Forty-sixth Ohio slightly in rear and to the extreme right of the line. At about 12m. the brigade was attacked on its right flank by Trabue. In an engagement lasting until 1:30 p.m. the Sixth Iowa had 52 killed - they were buried in one grave where they fell; they Forty-sixth Ohio had 246 killed and wounded, and the Fortieth Illinois 216 killed and wounded. The brigade commander was thrown form his horse and disabled. At 2:30 p.m. the brigade retired to the Landing and later formed behind Hurlbut. On Monday, the Sixth Iowa and Fortieth Illinois were attached to Garfield's brigade of Army of the Ohio, and remained with him until Wednesday, but were not engaged.
The above is from Reed's history of the battle. To read McDowell's report, click here. Unfortunately I cannot find a picture of McDowell

Sherman's Division



Fifth Division – Brigadier General William T. Sherman (wounded) (OR Report)

First Brigade - Colonel John A. McDowell (OR Report)
6th Iowa (OR Report)
46th Ohio
40th Illinois

Second Brigade - (1.) Colonel David Stuart (wounded) (OR Report); (2.) Colonel T. Kilby Smith
55th Illinois
54th Ohio
71st Ohio (OR Report)

Third Brigade - Colonel Jesse Hildebrand
53d Ohio (OR Report)
57th Ohio
77th Ohio (OR Report)

Fourth Brigade - Colonel Ralph P. Buckland (OR Report)
48th Ohio (OR Report)
70th Ohio
72d Ohio
Sherman's division was a bit spread out in that Stuart's brigade was located on the far left of the Union lines and did not fight with the rest of their division. The rest of the division was located near Shiloh church and was the first division struck in this portion of the battlefield. Sherman and McClernand fought well together the rest of the day, which seems ironic considering how much trouble McClernand would cause for Grant and Sherman the rest of the war.

Saturday, June 28, 2008

44th Indiana


On back of monument:
44th Infantry,
Commanded by Col. Hugh B. Reed.
This regiment formed in this line Sunday, April 6, 1862, at 8.30 a.m. It repulsed several charges made by the enemy, which, under orders of Gen. Bragg, was attempting to force this part of the line back. During these engagements the woods caught fire. At 2.30 p.m. regiment fell back to a line with 1st Brigade, then to rear and left of Bloody Pond, where it charged on enemy's infantry and artillery. Here seven flag- bearers were shot down. At 4.30 p.m. slowly fell back and supported siege guns. Monday, April 7th, regiment fought the enemy till 3 p.m. Number of men in action, 478. Casualties-- killed, 1 officers and 33 men; wounded, 6 officers and 171 men; missing, 1 man; total, 212.

This monument is along the Sunken Road defenses, but is located a short distance in front of the Sunken Road.

31st Indiana



On back of monument:
31st Infantry,
Commanded by Col. Charles Cruft, (Wounded)
Lieut. Col. John Osborn.
This regiment took this position Sunday, April 6, 1862, at 8.30 a.m., and held it against repeated charges of the enemy until 2.30 p.m. During this time the woods in front caught fire, and many dead and wounded were burned. The regiment was then transferred to the left and was engaged east of the Hamburg road until 4 p.m., when it slowly retired to the support of the siege guns. On Monday, April 7, 1862, it was engaged during the day on the right center of the army. Casualties--killed, 2 officers and 19 men; wounded, 4 officers and 110 men; missing, 2 men; total, 138.

This monument is located along the Sunken Road, roughly halfway between Duncan Field and the Peach Orchard.

Friday, June 27, 2008

Lauman's Brigade

This brigade had formerly belonged to the Army of the Ohio, where it was know as Cruft's brigade. It was sent from that army to reenforce Grant at Fort Donelson and had remained with the Army of the Tennessee. General Lauman was assigned to the command April 5, 1862. Its camp was on the south side of Dill Branch, its right at the Hamburg road. About 8 a.m. Sunday April 6, 1862, it moved out to the west side of the Peach Orchard field and formed line with its right in the woods near the head of Tilghman Creek. The order of its regiments from left to right was: Seventeenth-Kentucky, Twenty-fifth Kentucky, Forty-fourth Indiana, Thirty-first Indiana. About 9 a.m. it was attacked through the timber on its right by Gladden's brigade, closely followed in succession by attacks, upon its whole line, by Stephens's brigade and the right of Gibson's brigade. One of the features of the battle at this place was the burning of the leaves and brush in the woods where the wounded were lying.


About 2 p.m. the brigade was transferred to the left and formed in open woods just east of the Hamburg road, the Thirty-first Indiana in reserve on left flank. This position was held until about 4 p.m., when the brigade retired with its division to the seige guns. After the action for the day had closed it moved 150 yards to front and bivouacked for the night. On Monday at 10 a.m. it reported to Sherman and served with him until the close of the battle.

The above is from Reed's history of the battle. Click here to read Lauman's report.

Thursday, June 26, 2008

46th Illinois

On back of monument:
46th Infantry,
Commanded by 1. Col. John A. Davis, Wounded.
2. Lieut. Col. J. J. Jones.
Formed here for battle at 9.30 a.m., April 6, 1862, and maintained its position until 11.00 a.m., then withdrew north- ward, to Jones field and formed a new line. Its loss in the battle was 25 men killed; 10 officers and 124 men wounded; 1 man missing; total, 160.

This monument is located south of the Water Oaks Pond, which can be seen in the background to the left of the monument. It is the higher brown grass.

15th Illinois

On back of monument:
15th Infantry,
Commanded by 1. Lieut. Col. E. F. W. Ellis, Killed.
2. Major WM. R. Goddard, Killed.
3. Capt. Louis D. Kelley.
This regiment was attacked on this line about 9.30 a.m., April 6, 1862, and offered most stubborn resistance for more than one hour, the enemy attacking both front and flank. In this action both field officers and several line officers were lost. The regiment retired in good order and formed a new line. Its loss in the battle was 5 officers and 44 men killed; 8 officers and 109 men wounded; total, 166.

This monument is located very near "the crossroads," the intersection of the Hamburg-Purdy Road and the Corinth Road north of Shiloh Church. The Water Oaks Pond can be seen in the background to the right of the monument.

Wednesday, June 25, 2008

14th Illinois

On back of monument:
14th Infantry,
Commanded by Col. Cyrus Hall.
Went into battle on this line about 9.30 a.m., April 6, 1862, and with slight changes of position held it until 11 a.m., when the regiment fell back to the road and formed a new line. It lost in the battle 9 officers and 117 men wounded; 35 men killed; 4 missing; total, 165.

This monument is located on the east side of Woolf Field along the Corinth Road.

25th Indiana


On back of monument:
25th Infantry,
Commanded by Lieut. Col. William H. Morgan, (Wounded)
Maj. John W. Foster.
This regiment took this position at 9 a.m., April 6, 1862, and held it against a fierce assault of the enemy for two hours. Being flanked, fell back 100 yards; again it fell back 100 yards. Here regiment was furiously assailed by infantry and artillery, which caused it to fall back slowly to the right of the siege guns, where it rested Sunday night. On Monday, April 7, regiment continued in battle during the day. Casualties--killed, 2 officers and 19 men; wounded, 4 officers and 111 men; missing, 3 men; total, 139.

Tuesday, June 24, 2008

Veatch's Brigade


This brigade, of four regiments, was encamped across the Hamburg and Savannah road, north of the Corinth road. It was sent April 6, 1862, to reenforce McClernand, and moved out along the Corinth road and formed in line behind Marsh's brigade at about 9 a.m. in the following order from left to right: Twenty-fifth Indiana, Fourteenth Illinois, Forty-sixth Illinois, Fifteenth Illinois. It became engaged at about 10:30 a.m., and at 11 a.m. was compelled to retire. The Twenty-fifth Indiana and Fourteenth Illinois fell back 200 yards, changing front to rear on left companies, and forming along the road that runs from review field past McClernanad's headquarters. A little later they retired to the right of Hare's brigade, where they held their position until after noon, when they fell back to McClernand's sixth line, where they engaged in Pond's repulse at 4:30 a.m., after which they joined Hurlbut in his last position on Sunday. The Fifteenth Illinois lost all its field officers and several captains at first position and retired at 11 a.m. to the Jones Field, where it was joined by the Forty-sixth Illinois in supporting Barrett's battery. These two regiments joined McDowell's left in the advance at 12 m. and continued in line until 1 p.m., when they retired - the Fifteenth Illinois to join Hurlbut, the Forty-sixth Illinois to its camp for dinner; later the Forty-sixth joined Marsh's command on the Hamburg road and assisted in the final action of the day and was with Marsh's command on Monday. The Fourteenth and Fifteenth Illinois and Twenty-fifth Indiana, under Colonel Veatch, formed the left of the Army of the Tennessee on Monday and joined McCook's right until about 11 a.m., when they crossed the Corinth road near Duncan's and were engaged in Review field and in front line until 4 p.m.


The above is from Reed's history of the battle. Click here to read Veatch's report.

Monday, June 23, 2008

41st Illinois

On back of monument:
41st Infantry, Commanded by 1. Col. Isaac Pugh.
2. Lieut. Col. A. Tupper, Killed.
3. Major John Warner.
4. Capt. John N. Hale.

This position was first attacked about 9.00 a.m., April 6, 1862, on a line 100 yards in front, but soon fell back to this position which it held until 2.00 p.m., when it withdrew to repair guns and get ammunition. Its loss in the battle was 2 officers and 19 men killed; 2 officers and 71 men wounded; 3 men missing; total, 97.

As you can see this monument is also near the Peach Orchard. The William Manse George cabin can be see in the background as well as the replanted Peach Orchard.

32nd Illinois


On back of monument:
32d Infantry,
Commanded by Col. John Logan, Wounded.
Advanced in line of battle April 6, 1862, through this field to the timber, then fell back to this position and engaged the enemy from about 9.30 to 11.30 a.m., when it moved to the left and rear of the 41st Illinois. The regiment lost in the battle 3 officers and 36 men killed; 6 officers and 108 men wounded; 5 men missing; total, 158.

This monument is located on the south side of the Peach Orchard.

Sunday, June 22, 2008

28th Illinois

On back of monument:
28th Infantry,
Commanded by Col. A. K. Johnson.
Held this line and one about 200 yards south against heavy and constant fire from 9.30 a.m. to 2.00 p.m., April 6, 1862, then retreated to the woods on the north side of this field. The regiment lost in the battle 2 officers and 27 men killed; 8 officers and 203 men wounded; 1 officer and 4 men missing; total, 245.

You can see the William Manse George cabin in the background as well as the replanted Peach Orchard.

3rd Iowa


On back of monument:
Iowa 3d Regiment Infantry Volunteers,
Commanded by Major William M. Stone, (Captured)
Lieut. George W. Crosley.
This regiment went into action, Sunday, April 6, 1862, on the south side of this field at about 9 a.m. It soon fell back to this place, which it held against repeated attacks until 2 p.m., when it fell back two hundred yards, and one hour later withdrew to the Wicker field. Here it was engaged until 4 p.m., when it retired, fighting, to its camp, where it was nearly surrounded, but broke through the ranks of the enemy and joined the command of Col. M. M. Crocker, in front of 2d Iowa Camp, where it bivouacked Sunday night. On Monday it was engaged under Lieut. Crosley, he being senior officer for duty. Present for duty, including officers, musicians, teamsters, etc., 560. Its loss was 23 men killed; 6 officers and 128 men wounded; 3 officers and 27 men missing; total, 187.

Saturday, June 21, 2008

Williams' Brigade

This brigade of four regiments was encamped across the Corinth road, 1¼ miles from the river. On Sunday morning, April 6, 1862, at about 8 o'clock, it moved out on the Hamburg road and formed line of battle along the south side of the Peach Orchard field in following order form left to right: Forty-first Illinois, Twenty-eighth Illinois, Thirty-second Illinois, Third Iowa. In this position it was attacked by skirmishers from Chalmers's brigade and by artillery fire, by which Colonel Williams was disabled and the command of the brigade passed to Colonel Pugh, Forty-first Illinois. Chalmers's brigade was withdrawn and Colonel Pugh retired his brigade to the center field, where he was attacked at about 1:30 p.m. by Statham's and Stephen's brigades, and at 2:30 was driven back to the north side of the field. The Thirty-second Illinois was transferred to the left of the brigade east of Hamburg road, and lost its Lieutenant Colonel Ross, killed. As the left on the line was driven back, Colonel Pugh again fell back to the Wicker Field, where he held his line until 4 p.m., when the brigade retired, under Hurlbut's orders, to position near siege guns, where it remained in line Sunday night. The Third Iowa, occupying the right of Hurlbut's line, connected with Prentiss and remained until about 5 p.m., then retired through its camp and along Pittsburg road just before the Confederates closed their line behind Prentiss. Major Stone, commanding the regiment, was captured; other casualties of the day among the officers left the regiment in command of Lieutenant Crosley. He joined his command to the Thirteenth Iowa in the last action of the day, and then reported to his brigade commander. He commanded the regiment, in action with his brigade, the next day. On Monday the brigade formed on McClernand's left and was engaged until noon.
The above is from Reed's history of the battle. Williams did not write a report of his brigade's actions during the battle, instead it was written by Colonel Isaac C. Pugh. Click here to read Pugh's report.

Williams in a post war view:
Pugh during the war: (Only picture I could find of him)


Hurlbut's Division


Hurlbut's headquarters were located in Cloud Field. This is one of the larger fields at Shiloh and would have served as an excellent drilling ground. One of his brigades, Veatch's, was sent to help McClernand. His other two brigades moved down to the Peach Orchard area to help Prentiss and WHL Wallace with that defense.

Fourth Division - Brigadier General Stephen A. Hurlbut

First Brigade - (1.) Colonel N. G. Williams (Wounded) (2.) Colonel Isaac C. Pugh (OR Report)
3d Iowa (OR Report)
28th Illinois (OR Report)
32d Illinois (OR Report)
41st Illinois (OR Report)

Second Brigade - Colonel James C. Veatch (OR Report)
25th Indiana (OR Report)
14th Illinois (OR Report)
15th Illinois (OR Report)
46th Illinois (OR Report)

Third Brigade - Brigadier General Jacob G. Lauman (OR Report)
31st Indiana (OR Report)
44th Indiana (OR Report)
17th Kentucky (OR Report)
25th Kentucky (OR Report)

Friday, June 20, 2008

78th Ohio

On front of monument:
Ohio 78th Infantry,
Commanded by Col. Mortimer D. Leggett,
Whittlesey's (3d) Brigade, L. Wallace's (3d) Division, Army of the Tennessee.

On back of monument:
This regiment was engaged north of Jones field at 8 a.m., April 7, 1862; was transferred to the right and was engaged here from 2 p.m. to 3 p.m. Present for duty, 635 officers and men. Its loss was 1 man killed; 9 wounded; total, 10.

76th Ohio

On front of monument:
Ohio 76th Infantry,
Commanded by Col. Charles R. Woods,
Whittlesey's (3d) Brigade, L. Wallace's (3d) Division, Army of the Tennessee.

On back of monument:
This regiment was engaged north of Jones field at 8 a.m., April 7, 1862. It then supported Stuart's brigade until about 2 p.m., when it was engaged here in front line. Its loss was 4 men wounded; 1 missing; total, 5.

Thursday, June 19, 2008

56th Ohio

On front of monument:
Ohio 56th Infantry,
Commanded by Col. Peter Kinney,
Whittlesey's (3d) Brigade, L. Wallace's (3d) Division, Army of the Tennessee.

On back of monument:
This regiment was left to guard stores at Crump's Landing.

20th Ohio

On front of monument:
Ohio 20th Infantry,
Commanded by Lt. Col. Manning F. Force,
Whittlesey's (3d) Brigade, L. Wallace's (3d) Division, Army of the Tennessee.
On back of monument:
This regiment was engaged northwest of Jones field at 8 a.m., April 7, 1862. It then supported the left of the division until about noon, when it returned to the extreme right of the army and was engaged here from 2 to 3 p.m. It had present for duty, officers and men, 491. Its loss was 1 man killed; 1 officer and 18 men wounded; total, 20.

Whittlesey's Brigade

The brigade of four Ohio regiments, to wit, the Twentieth, Fifty-sixth, Seventy-sixth and Seventy-eighth, was encamped at Adamsville, 4 miles from Crumps. It formed in line early Sunday morning, April 6, 1862, when firing was heard at Shiloh, with all its camp equipage on wagons, and remained in line until 2 p.m., when orders were received to join the other brigades en route for Shiloh. It marched on direct road toward Pittsburg, falling in behind the other brigades as they came back into that road from the countermarch. At about 4 p.m. the Fifty-sixth was detached and ordered to go with baggage to Crump's Landing. The other regiments arrived on the battlefield after dark and bivouacked in front of the camp of the Eighty-first Ohio. Monday morning the brigade formed the extreme right of Union line, its right, the Seventy-sixth, on the swamps of Owl Creek, the Seventy-eighth on the left in rear of the right of the Second Brigade, the Twentieth in reserve, until it crossed Tilghman Creek, when it took position on the right. Retaining this formation the brigade advanced, swinging to the left until 11 a.m., when it was transferred to left of the division in support of Stuart's brigade of Sherman's division. The Seventy-sixth remained on the left, the other regiments soon returned to the right, the Twentieth in front line, the Seventy-eighth in reserve. The last engagement by this brigade was between the Twentieth Ohio, in the field near McDowell's headquarters, and Confederates at camp of Forty-sixth Ohio. The brigade bivouacked in camp of Sixth Iowa Monday night.

The above is from Reed's history of the battle. There is no monument as earlier explained in the Lew Wallace post. Click here to read Whittlesey's report. I could not find a picture of Whittlesey, but instead found this newspaper picture.



Wednesday, June 18, 2008

1858 by Bruce Chadwick

1858: Abraham Lincoln, Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, Ulysses S. Grant and the War they Failed to See by Bruce Chadwick.

Horrible title. Grant barely makes an appearance in this book, Sherman has more of a presence. But I liked the book. The book is separated into 7 stories highlighting important characters of 1858, with the happenings at the White House interspersed. Those other seven stories cover Jefferson Davis, Robert E. Lee, William T. Sherman, William H. Seward, John Brown, the Oberlin Slave Rescue and the Lincoln-Douglas debates.

I think most books should strive to educate and to make you think. This book fits both of these criteria. There was some stuff I knew but in particular for me this book illuminated the role of Buchanan in the Lincoln-Douglas campaign.

Some of the reviews I've read online have been less than complimentary, often nitpicking on how terrible the title was and focusing more on the cover than on the substance. I do not think this book is the definitive tome on the prelude to the war, that honor belongs to William W. Freehling's The Road to Disunion (its actually two volumes for the whole history). But this book is a good book on 1858 and is an easier read than Freehling. I love Freehling's books but they seem to be so in depth that it isn't until the second or third reading that I really get a firm grasp of the subject matter. Chadwick has provided a much easier read to explain the important events of 1858, a year when a lot of the stage was set for the Civil War that was coming three years later.

I also agree with Chadwick that 1858 became the year that slavery was the principal political issue. All other questions and issues were shaped by the slavery debate. Sure slavery had been a big issue for many years prior but by 1858 there is no turning the tide, slavery has become the principal issue.

68th Ohio

On front of monument:
Ohio 68th Infantry,
Commanded by Col. Samuel H. Steedman,
Thayer's (2d) Brigade, L. Wallace's (3d) Division, Army of the Tennessee
On back of monument:
This regiment was left to guard stores at Crump's Landing.
It seems odd that a regiment that probably didn't touch a minie ball all day choose a minie ball as their monument design.

58th Ohio

On front of monument:
Ohio 58th Infantry,
Commanded by Col. Valentine Bausenwein,
Thayer's (2d) Brigade, L. Wallace's (3d) Division, Army of the Tennessee.

On back of monument:
This regiment was engaged at north end of Jones field at 8 a.m., April 7, 1862. It advanced to this place, where it was engaged from 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. It had present for duty, officers and men, 630. Its loss was 9 men killed; 2 officers and 40 men wounded; total, 51.

Tuesday, June 17, 2008

23rd Indiana

On back of monument:
23d Infantry
Commanded by Col. William L. Sanderson
From Stony Lonesome, April 6, 1862, at 12 m., this regiment marched to a point near Clear Creek; countermarched there, it reached battlefield, via Savannah road, 7.30 p.m. April 7th, formed line of battle at sunrise, engaged the enemy, drove him to this position, where two hours of desperate fighting occurred. Enemy retreated, followed by this regiment until nightfall. Casualties--killed, 7 men; wounded, 1 officer and 34 men; missing, 1 man; total, 43.

Thayer's Brigade

This brigade was encamped at Stony Lonesome, 2 ½ miles from the Tennessee River, on the Purdy road. The Sixty-eighth Ohio was detailed to guard the baggage, the other regiments of the brigade followed the First Brigade in its march toward Shiloh April 6, 1862. It countermarched, from a point 4 ½ miles out, to the Adamsville and Pittsburg road, and thence via river road to the battlefield, where it arrived after dark and bivouacked, in line of battle, at the right of the First Brigade. Monday morning it formed en ├ęchelon in right rear of the First Brigade, the First Nebraska on the left, the Twenty-third Indiana on the right, and the First Brigade through the day and bivouacked at night in the camp of the Forty-sixth Ohio.

The above is from Reed's history of the battle. There is no monument as earlier explained in the Lew Wallace post. Click here to read Thayer's report.

Monday, June 16, 2008

24th Indiana

On back of monument:
24th Infantry
Commanded by Col. Alvin P. Hovey
From Crump's Landing, April 6, 1862, this regiment marched to Stony Lonesome, thence 12 m. to a point near Clear Creek; countermarched there, it reached battlefield, via Savannah road, 7.30 p.m. April 7th, engaged the enemy at 5.30 a.m., drove him back to this position, where it was furiously assaulted for two hours. Enemy gave way, pursued him till nightfall, halting on south side of Shiloh Branch. Casualties--killed, 3 officers and 3 men; wounded, 1 officer and 44 men; total, 51.

11th Indiana

The 11th Indiana was a Zouave regiment and its first commander was Lew Wallace, now its division commander.
On back of monument:
11th Infantry,
Commanded by Col. George F. McGinnis.
From Crump's Landing, April 6, 1862, this regiment marched to Stony Lonesome; thence, 12 m. to a point near Clear Creek; countermarching there, it reached battlefield, via Savannah road, 7.30 p.m. April 7th, engaged enemy 5.30 a.m., drove him back to this position, where it was furiously assailed for two hours. Enemy gave way. Pursued him till nightfall, halting on south side of Shiloh Branch. Casualties--killed, 11 men; wounded, 1 officer and 50 men; total, 62.

Sunday, June 15, 2008

ML Smith's Brigade

This brigade was encamped at Crump's Landing. It moved out 2 ½ miles on Purdy road to Stony Lonesome and joined the Second Brigade early Sunday morning, April 6, 1862. At 12m., it started for Shiloh by a road leading southwesterly toward the right of Sherman's camp. At about 2:30 p.m. the brigade was counter marched to the Adamsville and Pittsburg road by which it reached the battlefield about dark and bivouacked in front of the camp of the Fourteenth Missouri. On Monday the brigade formed in Perry Field, near McArthur's headquarters; the Twenty-fourth Indiana on the left, the Eleventh Indiana on the right, and the Eighth Missouri in reserve. At about 6:30 a.m. it advanced across Tilghman Creek and at 8 a.m. entered the field of Hare's brigade camp. It crossed said field in a southwesterly direction, driving back the Confederate forces, thence through the Cresent Field and to McDowell's brigade camp, where it bivouacked Monday night. Losses during the day, 18 killed and 114 wounded. The Twenty-fourth Indiana lost its lieutenant colonel, 1 captain, and 1 lieutenant killed.

The above is from Reed's history of the battle. Apparently Smith left no official report and there is no monument as earlier explained in the Lew Wallace post.

Lew Wallace's Division

Lew Wallace's Division missed the first day of combat. They were stationed north of the battlefield to protect against a possible move against Crump's Landing. Ever since then Wallace has been the subject of much debate, centering on how long it took his division to reach the battlefield. In a future post I'll go through all the various evidence for and against him, right now I want to continue in my series of posts covering the order of battle.

The brief version is that when the sound of battle was first heard, Wallace boarded a steamer at Crump's Landing so that he could talk with Grant as he passed from Savannah to Pittsburg Landing. In this very brief exchange Grant said to get ready and orders would come as soon as he knew the situation. Quickly after Grant arrived on the battlefield it was obvious that this was the main Confederate effort and Wallace could leave his camps. Sometime around noon Wallace leaves his camps and heads to the battlefield on one road, later Grant's staff over takes him and says his road is in enemy hands and he should take a different road. Wallace turns around and winds up on the battlefield as the battle closes on April 6th.

On April 7th he'll form the right flank of the army and move (generally) from the Jones Field area to an area just west of Woolf Field. Some also think his actions on day two were also subpar.

Third Division - Major General Lewis Wallace (OR report)

First Brigade - Colonel Morgan L. Smith
8th Missouri
11th Indiana (OR report)
24th Indiana (OR report)

Second Brigade - Colonel John M. Thayer (OR report)
1st Nebraska (OR report)
23d Indiana (OR report)
58th Ohio (OR report)
68th Ohio

Third Brigade - Colonel Charles Whittlesey (OR report)
20th Ohio (OR report)
56th Ohio
76th Ohio
78th Ohio

Since Wallace's camps are outside of the park boundary there are no monuments for his headquarters or camps. In Adamsville is this marker put up by the Tennessee Historical Commission.

Saturday, June 14, 2008

58th Illinois

On back of monument:
58th Infantry,
Commanded by Col. Wm. F. Lynch.
This regiment held this line with slight changes of position from about 9.00 a.m., April 6, 1862, until its capture about 5.30 p.m. The regiment lost in battle 20 men killed; 8 officers and 39 men wounded; 223 men missing; total, 290.

57th Illinois

On back of monument:
57th Infantry,
Commanded by
1. Col. S. D. Baldwin.
2. Capt. G. A. Busse.
This regiment was held in reserve behind Richardson's Battery until about 2.00 p.m., April 6, 1862, when it was moved to this point in the line, and held its position until about 4 p.m., when it fell back to the Landing. The regiment lost in the battle 3 officers and 24 men killed; 7 officers and 103 men wounded; 3 men missing; total, 140.

Friday, June 13, 2008

52nd Illinois


On back of monument:
52d Infantry,
Commanded by 1. Major H. Stark.
2. Capt. E. A. Bowen.
This regiment was held in reserve until 4 p.m., April 6, 1862, when it formed for battle on this line and resisted the attack of the enemy until withdrawn for the night. Its loss in the battle was 1 officer and 22 men killed; 3 officers and 120 men wounded; 9 men missing; total, 155.